Eric Van Genderen, SETAC North America Vice President

Last fall, we added five new members to the SETAC North America Board of Directors. I would like to introduce them to you! The board members reflect a geographic, sector, and scientific diversity, with three government sector employees from Missouri, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island; a scientist from the private sector in Texas, all of whom will serve for three years; and a new North America Student Advisory Council (NASAC) student vice chair representing Ohio, who will serve a two-year term. These opportunities to advance the SETAC mission and represent members only come about due to vacancies left as previous Board members’ terms come to an end. As such, we also thank Sarah Bowman, Jim Lazorchak, Jeff Steevens, Leah Thornton Hampton (NASAC), and John Toll (2018 President) for their invaluable contributions and service to SETAC North America over the past several years.

Please join us in welcoming the incoming SETAC North America board members!

North America Board Members (2019–2022)

Walter Berry

Walter Berry

Walter Berry has been working at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development lab in Narragansett, Rhode Island, since 1979, first as a graduate student, then university researcher, contractor and federal employee. At various times in his career, he has worked in sediment toxicology, the development of water quality criteria and sediment guidelines, wetlands ecology, and navigational dredging. He is currently the Stakeholder Engagement Lead for ORD’s Nutrients Translational (solutions driven) Science Pilot. He serves on the executive boards of the Land Conservancy of North Kingstown and The Concerned Citizens of Davisville and has been on the editorial board of Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management since its founding. Over his 40-year career, he has become a strong advocate for including researchers and stakeholders as a key component of decision-making and identifying solutions related to environmental management. Berry suggested that one of the most important parts of his job is to attend meetings and ask people, “Who is going to use this, and what are they going to use it for?” He is happiest when he is walking his dog, or watching and recording birds, or fishing from his canoe or kayak.

Sarah Hughes

Sarah Hughes

Sarah Hughes has been working as Senior Ecotoxicologist at Shell Oil Company in Houston, Texas since 2008, where she provides subject matter expertise on the environmental fate and effects of chemicals and contaminants and develop research solutions for Shell’s businesses globally. Hughes obtained a B.S. in Environmental Science at University of Guelph, Canada (2002), an M.S. (2005) and Ph.D. (2008) in Environmental Toxicology at the University of Saskatchewan in Canada where she investigated the bioaccessibility, fate, and phytotoxicity of organic contaminants in plants. In her current role, she has been exposed to a broad spectrum of ecotoxicology and environmental chemistry science and regulatory issues. In addition, Hughes is adjunct faculty at four universities (University of Saskatchewan, University of Alberta, Clemson University and, most recently, Texas Christian University). In her vision statement for the SETAC North America Board of Directors nomination, Hughes expressed her commitment to supporting SETAC as the best forum to help support the science and tools needed for the next generation of risk assessment tools that address evolving chemicals management regulations in North America. In her spare time, Hughes enjoys escaping the city with her family (40,000 miles on hybrid trailer in the past five years!), mountain biking (first place in the 2019 Texas XC Mountain Bike State Championship Series), cooking, and gardening.

Nile Kemble

Nile Kemble

Nile Kemble is a Fisheries Biologist with USGS at the Columbia Environmental Research Center in Missouri. He received a B.S. degree from the University of Nebraska-Kearney in Biology with a Wildlife emphasis (1984) and a M.S. from the University of Missouri in Fisheries Management (1989). Over the past 30 years, he has conducted research to develop methods for assessing the bioavailability and toxicity of contaminants in water, sediment and food sources to fish and aquatic invertebrates. Kemble’s current research is primarily focused on 1) evaluating toxicity and effects of hazardous algal blooms on freshwater fish and invertebrates and 2) working on developing a bait food for eradicating invasive carp. Kemble has served on the editorial board of Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry (ET&C) from 2002–2004 and continues to review for ET&C, as well as numerous other journals. Outside of work, Kemble loves to spend time with his family, playing with his grandchildren, photography, canoeing down a clear Missouri Ozark stream, kayaking local lakes and rivers, playing softball, hiking and sitting around a campfire with good friends.

Cynthia Stahl

Cynthia Stahl

Cynthia Stahl is a scientist with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Traditionally trained as a bench scientist in biology and biochemistry, she has spent her 35-year career applying these sciences, first in toxicology and then in multi-criteria environmental policy analysis. With each educational and career move, Stahl’s primary focus shifted from conducting good science, to assuring the presentation of relevant science to decision-makers, to integrating science across scientific disciplines and understanding decision-making context that is shaped by diverse social and cultural perspectives for multi-criteria decision-making. To this end, Stahl continually looks for ways to incorporate other perspectives, as these provide important context and perspective to how we think about, conduct and apply science. In her spare time, she considers herself an amateur musician (community band flute player), world traveler (notable trip along the Silk Road through five “stans” – Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, and Turkmenistan), an avid reader, and enjoys spending time with her husband and two cats.

North America Student Advisory Council (NASAC) Board Members

James Feller

James Feller

James Feller is the Vice Chair of NASAC and a Ph.D. student at Ohio State University (anticipated graduation – Fall 2021) where he uses environmental DNA to track ecosystem responses to anthropogenic stress. As the NASAC Vice-Chair, he enthusiastically accepts the responsibility of acting as the voice of all SETAC students in North America. Feller reported that he is committed to increasing opportunities for students to share research ideas, getting more students involved in Interest Groups, and increasing social media presence among student members and Regional Chapters. In his personal life, Feller enjoys brewing beer, running marathons and triathlons, and remains a committed Cleveland Browns fan.

As all SETAC members know, volunteers make the Society run! The incredible work demonstrated by each of these new board members, along with the efforts made each day by people on committees and Interest Groups, serving within Regional Chapters, providing reviews for journals and awards, and chairing sessions; your hard work does not go unnoticed. If you want to find ways to contribute, please reach out and let us know. All of us on the board can honestly say that volunteering not only serves the Society but also provides personal opportunities for networking, career development, and education. Please don’t hesitate to reach out to any of us with your questions, comments, or suggestions on how we can create new opportunities for you.

Author’s contact information: evangenderen@zinc.org

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