SETAC Globe - Environmental Quality Through Science
16 April 2015
Volume 16 Issue 4
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I know I Can Be a Lot Braver About Exploring Our World

Jennifer Gundersen and Diane Nacci, SETAC North America Awards and Fellowships Committee

Craig Wilson was the recipient of the 2014 SETAC/Menzie Environmental Education Award, receiving this honor for his extensive and passionate work with underrepresented elementary and middle school students and their teachers. His approach encourages science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) solutions to a range of current environmental challenges. However, as it often is, the positive impact of outstanding individuals or groups of individuals goes much further as a fourth grader exemplified in a letter of thanks to Wilson, “I know I can be a lot braver about exploring our world…Take care and thanks for everything.”

Now it’s your turn to help us identify and honor those who deserve special recognition for their outstanding contributions to the environmental sciences and to the Society. You can apply or nominate a worthy colleague, group, organization or business to be honored for their work and dedication. Please act quickly, because award applications are due 30 April!
Applications are being accepted for the following awards and fellowships:   

SETAC Global Awards

SETAC North America Awards

These awards will be announced at the SETAC North America 36th Annual Meeting, taking place from 1–5 November in Salt Lake City, Utah.

See details about awards and application procedures for global awards and North America awards. All applications must be submitted electronically to setac@setac.org by 30 April 2015.

As for Wilson’s outstanding contributions, he recognized the benefits of cultivating natural inquisitiveness and scientific exploration. Research shows that many American students lose their zeal for science and mathematics in middle school, and Wilson has intentionally focused his efforts on districts that serve underrepresented minorities. His successful corn earworm research project has seen more than 71,000 shipments of worms since 2006 and continues to be well received.

If you know of any individual, group, organization or business that has made great strides in improving environmental science curricula and technical education at any level of the educational system and supports innovative educational programs that encourage and stimulate the professional development of environmental scientists, please submit their information for the 2015 SETAC/Menzie Environmental Education Award. The recipient of this award will receive $1,000 donated by the Menzie Family.

To learn more about Wilson and his extensive and passionate work with underrepresented elementary and middle school students and their teachers, visit www.setac.org/?page=AwardCWilson. You can read more about all 2014 SETAC and SETAC North America award winners at www.setac.org/awards2014.

Authors’ contact information: gundersen.jennifer@epa.gov, Nacci.Diane@epa.gov

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